F I N E   H Y D R O C A L   C A S T I N G S   B Y   C.   C.   C R O W    
  P.   O.   B O X   1 4 2 7         M U K I L T E O,     W A     9 8 2 7 5     U S A    


NP HOTEL - EASTON

The NP Hotel at Easton, Washington.

NP 90 ft. BRICK ROUND HOUSE

The Northern Pacific 90 ft. Brick Round House. The ultimate railroad structure kit.

NP FREIGHT HOUSE
STORAGE HOUSE

The NP Freight House. Pilot model.

MISSISSIPPI ST. TOWER

The Mississippi St. Tower. A small interlocking tower.

NP BACK SHOP or CAR SHOP

Floor plan of backshop showing pits, floor and wall footprint.

FINE HYDROCAL CASTINGS BY C. C. CROW



STICKS IN THE CROW'S NEST

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Sept. 15, 2004
revised - CCC
June 22, 2009


    NORTHERN PACIFIC HO SCALE KITS


    These craftsman kits are based on the prototype.

    The Northern Pacific was a very interesting railroad.
Not only did they roam some of the most beautiful country side around but they did it with class. Perhaps it wasn't the most eligant, but it was all railroad.

    To support this effort the NP, like many other railroads developed standard plans for their buildings. They had a certain feel and style that identified with the parent railroad.

    These standard designs guided the construction of facilities across the system. Local requirements, readily avaiable materials and other factors such as the construction crew's techniques could modify the plan, but still they carried the NP brand.

    The first NP model I built was chronicled in Mainline Modeler magazine. It was a model of the Standard Plan of 1899 1st Class 70 ft. Brick Round House. I like that name. Unfortunately, or at least it was a hard taught lesson, I followed the 1899 vintage prototype plans exactly and after the fact, learned that 11 ft. wide engine doors are, well, sort of really tight, especially on a model! Only the tiniest of locomotives would ever fit in. So much for Proto:87 for me!

    I wouldn't make the same mistake twice though the railroad wisely increased the engine door width on my next NP roundhouse model, the 90 ft. Brick Round House based on the standard Plan of 1910. At 13 ft. we are still tight but it works.

    Just like the real railroads we model railroaders are ususally very tight on space. When it comes to roundhouses we usually make a major mistake. We don't allow enough room. We should blame it on the model railroad press. Almost every plan you look at shows the roundhouse crammed right up against the turntable pit.

    WRONG, wrong, wrong!

    As you get closer you actually start wasting room as your rear walls start to balloon out. The real railroads seldom did this. Instead, the roundhouse was placed well back so the stalls were narrower (wide roofing is expensive!) and there could be more stalls. The NP standard plan is based on a 60 stall circle with 23'-6" rear walls. The face of the engine house was set back 139'-9" from the turntable center.

    This makes a lot of sence to me. Think about it. You also gain additional room in front of the roundhouse to exhibit your locomotives or allow the longer ones to stick out a little. The real railroads did this you know.

    I shouldn't do this, but okay, I broke down and made some wider rear walls for those of you who just don't have the space or have already commited a certain space and there is no way to modify it. Unfortunately, if you choose this option you will not be able to take advantage of the cast inspection pits and brick floor option. Because they are cast to the specific angles they cannot be modified.

    As I said, the NP had a whole series of standard plans. Next we have what I call the NP Brick Freight House however that name is somewhat misleading. Actaully, this building was used more as a railroad supply and storage house. I've seen them at Centralia, Auburn and Pasco, Washington yards and no doubt they exist, or existed, at many other locations.

    Next on the NP list we have the Missisippi St. Tower. This too is an example of a standard plan (for a 32 lever Interlocking Electric Machine), modified with a flat pitched gabled roof. There are several other standard plans for interlocking towers, both larger and small, that I might consider doing in the future.

    Currently, I am working on another addition to the NP line, a back shop addition for the roundhouse. This model could also stand alone as either a car repair shop or as a two-stall brick engine house.

    With the purchase of Builders In Scale, these projects have been delayed a little. The good thing is I'm now working on some laser kits for the NP modeler. Just check out the NP Hotel at Easton! And yes, I'm working on Lester, too. I'd better not say any more, until we are certain of release dates.

    Indeed, the Northern Pacific Railway was a very interesting railroad, one well worth modeling and these are excellent kits with which to get you started.

HO SCALE KITS by C. C. CROW

    Classic C. C. Crow Kits    

    The Limited Run Kits    

    Northern Pacific Kits    


    Other Railroad Kits    

    On-Line Structure Kits    

    Off-Line Structure Kits    

    Fruit Industry Kits    

    Concrete Series    

    Fractured Stone Series    

    Scratch-Building Stock Panels    

    Reference Section    


ON-LINE HOW TO CLINICS

  HOW TO CLINICS  
Here are a bunch of my on-line how to work with Hydrocal mini-clinics. Each kit includes specific instructions of course- and there are lots of ways to do things, but here are my thoughts, tips and techniques.

  Coloring BRICK  
My traditional techniques for coloring and mortaring brick.

  Coloring STONE  
With a little practice you can color realistic stone walls too. Here's how I do it.
What are we going to do now that Testors/Floquil has dropped their Flo-Stains?


SCRATCH-BUILDING STOCK

  Standard Common Brick- fine  
If you like to scratch-build or just want to practice before you do, check out my stock castings. These are the same building blocks I use to create my kits.








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  C. C. CROW     P. O. BOX 1427      MUKILTEO, WA   98275   USA